2022 PDC Summit

Mar 22, 2022 ‐ Mar 23, 2022


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The PDC Summit is the premiere event for over 2,000 health care and hospital facility senior leadership. No other conference brings health care planning, design and construction decision-makers together like the PDC Summit.


Attendees will automatically earn 1 CEC from ASHE/AHA from each on-demand session

Looking for AIA LUs? Please self-report these on-demand sessions to the AIA for LUs.

A certificate of attendance will be provided once the evaluation is completed
(under the CE Information tab) from each on-demand session.


Standard: $295.00
Members: $195.00

Sessions

Protecting Health Care Facilities Fire & Life Safety Systems Against Cyberattacks

Mar 22, 2022 3:30pm ‐ Mar 22, 2022 4:30pm

Credits: None available.

Cyberattacks are increasingly disrupting patient care and putting patient safety at risk. Data breaches have, for example, made emergency medical records inaccessible, diverted ambulances, delayed treatments, and canceled appointments and surgery. While data breeches flood the headlines, it’s not the only way cybercriminals can compromise patient safety. Attacks on fire protection systems can cause false alarms, loss of communication or denial of service, which can interrupt patient care and compromise safety. Fire protection systems are increasingly networked to Building Control Systems (BCS), Internet of Things (IoT), and other platforms that are, by design or oversight, exposed to the public-facing internet. This emerging environment exposes fire and life safety systems to unique and novel cyber vulnerabilities and attacks that have the potential for significant consequences. Any weak point in a building’s information technology infrastructure, including equipment, building systems, IoT devices and more, can be exploited and used as a pathway for attack. This session will review the expansiveness of cyber vulnerabilities for fire and life safety systems in health care facilities, the severity of consequences, tactics to mitigate these threats, the role of codes and standards, and how to reduce these risks.

Learning Objectives:
  • Recognize the expansiveness of cyber vulnerabilities for fire and life safety systems in health care facilities.
  • Assess the severity of the consequences as a result of the identified vulnerabilities.
  • Identify tactics to mitigate these threats in your facility and the role of codes and standards.
  • Develop insightful strategies to reduce these cyber risks
  • N/A
Speaker(s):

An Insider’s Look at the 2022 FGI Guidelines

Mar 23, 2022 7:00am ‐ Mar 23, 2022 8:15am

Credits: None available.

The FGI Guidelines for Design and Construction documents are developed by professionals with a dedication to health and residential care and have spent thousands of hours preparing the 2022 series of Guidelines for publication. Join us as members of the 2022 Health Guidelines Revision Committee highlight changes in the 2022 FGI Guidelines, including new and revised behavioral and mental health spaces, clinical treatment areas and patient care units. Updates revisit familiar topics (e.g., ED treatment areas) and reflect new perspectives (e.g., emPATH units), all while balancing the need to make design affordable, accessible and maintainable.

Learning Objectives:
  • Explain how changes in the 2022 Guidelines will impact the design of clinical spaces in health and residential care facilities.
  • Describe the major proposed changes to the 2022 FGI Guidelines.
  • Identify the new clinical and patient care spaces that will be included in the 2022 Guidelines documents.
  • State how using the 2022 Guidelines for a project can provide a safe and effective patient care environment at a reasonable cost.
  • N/A
Speaker(s):

Carbon Reduction/Electrification – A New Health Care Design Paradigm

Mar 23, 2022 8:30am ‐ Mar 23, 2022 9:30am

Credits: None available.

This session will be a roundtable discussion, including interactive audience participation via smart phone survey, that outlines the national trends in carbon emission reduction policies and what technologies are available (and more importantly, viable) to help electrify building heating and cooling systems. The discussion will feature real-life application to a new state-of-the-art medical office building in an urban setting. This discussion will describe how innovative solutions can be implemented and how they affect initial massing of the building and yet maintain flexibility over time. Fundamental design features, including building envelope design, MEP space for roof-mounted equipment, central mechanical room space, ceiling cavity space and shaft space will be discussed. From an operational perspective, we will discuss how service and maintenance will differ from the past when newer technologies are applied.

Learning Objectives:
  • Implement electrification strategies for heating/cooling in a hospital setting.
  • Identify what design team members contribute to carbon emission reduction.
  • Strategize and prepare for impacts from carbon emissions reduction policies to health care settings.
  • Develop strategies to transition aging equipment to reduce carbon footprint.
  • N/A
Speaker(s):

Innovative Nutrition Services for the Small Format Facility

Mar 23, 2022 8:30am ‐ Mar 23, 2022 9:30am

Credits: None available.

As small-format facilities (i.e., rural, critical access and micro) struggle to remain financially viable, re-therm kitchens can innovatively reduce construction and operational costs. Owners and operators discuss how they achieved improved costsavings and dining experience in their small-format health care facility, while designers and operational consultants share the advantages of a re-therm kitchen model to reduce costs and achieve operational excellence.

Learning Objectives:
  • Assess current dietary model design against a re-therm kitchen concept.
  • Identify three key factors for implementing a re-therm kitchen concept.
  • Evaluate design and operational strategies to reduce costs and improve efficiencies.
  • Take the steps necessary to convert an existing dietary model to that of a retherm model.
  • N/A
Speaker(s):
  • David Marshall, Chief Operating Officer, Integrated Support Solutions Inc.
  • Kevin Meek, RN-BSN, BA, MHI, FACHE, Vice President / Division Leader - Design & Consulting Services Group, The Haskell Company

HC Ventilation – A New World Since COVID

Mar 23, 2022 8:30am ‐ Mar 23, 2022 9:30am

Credits: None available.

After two years engulfed in a global pandemic, hear from owners and industry experts on lessons learned, current shifts and future trends in PDC for health care.

Learning Objectives:
  • Apply lessons learned for the environment of care for large-scale pandemic outbreak.
  • Implement practical applications and best-practice PDC efforts to ensure future resiliency and flexibility of health care built environments.
  • Detail the current revisions to codes and standards for health care environments.
  • Integrate emergency planning into future planning, design and construction efforts using practical guidance and resources.
  • N/A
Speaker(s):

Ready Day One ‐ Bridging the PDC to Accreditation Gap

Mar 23, 2022 8:30am ‐ Mar 23, 2022 9:30am

Credits: None available.

Are you “Ready Day One” for accreditation? Your ROI = Risk of Inaction can greatly outweigh the traditional ROI = Return on Investment. Join this session to learn how to take control of your facility and be “Ready Day One” for accreditation! For example, some health systems have healthy PDC systems and processes, others do not. Regardless, being “Ready Day One” for accreditation is the building block of the operational excellence, so everyone needs to address their true capability and correct if necessary. . The creation of facility-friendly, survey-ready life safety drawings, life safety systems assessments and documentation review is crucial to all facility operations and accreditation.

Learning Objectives:
  • Empower the facility leadership team with the responsibility to identify accreditation gaps and inform the C-suite about the Risk of Inaction. Securing project funds for Accreditation Assurance and commissioning.
  • Use a specific task list to assess the maturity of each health system and determine where in the six-step process to engage.
  • Provide real-world examples of how a comprehensive Accreditation Assurance program can improve operational excellence and mitigate risk for the facility.
  • Create and implement an Accreditation Assurance program to improve operational excellence, mitigate risk for the facility and be “Ready Day One.”
  • N/A
Speaker(s):
  • Joshua Brackett, PE, SASHE, CHFM, System Regulatory Director - Facilities Operations, Banner Health
  • Scott Mason, CHOP, FRSPH(UK), HCC, Principal Consultant - Client Success, Dude Solutions, Inc.

Shifting Cultural Paradigms – A New Model of Care

Mar 23, 2022 8:30am ‐ Mar 23, 2022 9:30am

Credits: None available.

An interprofessional care team model (ICTM) is essential to providing safe, effective and high-quality health care. The development of an ICTM was a pivotal focus in the Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU’s (CHoR) Wonder Tower. From the project’s beginning, the clinical team was engaged, with an interprofessional mindset, to develop the building. Current state analysis identified several barriers to ICTM. Future state mapping developed targets for process improvement. Design development and intent documents highlighted the ICTM spaces and detailed the expected collaboration and experience within the space. Detailed operational maps focused on shifting the cultural mindset, incorporating decisions made along the way, including staffing models and technology. Integrating clinical perspectives throughout the CHoR approach resulted design and operational plans intended to shift the care paradigm from one of siloed to teams to an interprofessional care team model, resulting in increased communication, collaboration, experience and satisfaction, and improved clinical outcomes.

Learning Objectives:
  • Improve patient safety by understanding the built environment’s influence on communication.
  • Leverage clinical perspectives in the process of transforming the model of care for the future environment, including in current state assessment and the design and operational planning for a new building.
  • Describe the influence of design and operational planning in shifting the cultural mindset of interprofessional care teams.
  • Discuss the process utilized to advance the goals for the ICTM.
  • N/A
Speaker(s):
  • Zach Isbell, CHC, MSHA, PMP, Vice President, JLL
  • Erin Clark, RN, MS, EDAC, Clinical Operations Specialist, ClarkRN Consulting
  • Tracy Lowerre, RN, MS, CPN, Nurse Clinician, Acute Care Pediatrics; Clinical Liaison, CHoR Children's Hospital Project, Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Health
  • Kate Renner, AIA, EDAC, LSSGB, WELL AP, Vice President, HKS

Operational Implications of Behavioral Health Design

Mar 23, 2022 9:45am ‐ Mar 23, 2022 10:45am

Credits: None available.

This presentation will review the design of psychiatric treatment environments through an operational lens. We will discuss the impact of design decisions on operational efficiency and clinical effectiveness. The talk will include specific and actionable recommendations on making good decisions during programming and planning based on operational best practices. Over the life of a psychiatric treatment environment, the cost of staffing will greatly outweigh the initial capital costs. Even small impacts on the design of the space can lead to big savings and/or better outcomes over the life of the facility. Planning for operational efficiency and effectiveness is different in behavioral health care than in other health care environments. Because patients are ambulatory, the traditional metrics of nurse walking distances per shift are not useful for measuring the overall impact on staffing. Instead other metrics such as the number of staff needed for seclusion, observability of patient room doors for night shift, availability of support staff for incidents, medication delivery processes, and management of dining and activity time are key drivers of staffing needs and support. All these processes are heavily influenced by the design of the space.

Learning Objectives:
  • Assess the operational paradigm of a new or existing psychiatric treatment environment.
  • Identify the impact of the operational paradigm on design decisions.
  • Identify the impact of design decisions on the operational paradigm.
  • Use key operational concepts to make good decisions early in the design process.
  • N/A
Speaker(s):

Changing the Game: Using Data and a Collaborative Approach Against HAIs

Mar 23, 2022 9:45am ‐ Mar 23, 2022 10:45am

Credits: None available.

What happens when your infection prevention leader calls and informs engineering/plant services they’re investigating an HAI or SSI? They’re quick to check their four boxes: (1) Temp/humidity, (2) correct pressurization, (3) proper exchanges and (4) filter changed per PM schedule. “Yep! We’re good!” Despite having all that documentation, clinical staff are rarely convinced it wasn’t too hot/humid in the room. In one of our hospitals in Nashville, TN we weren’t satisfied with just checking our boxes. We wanted to qualify and visualize our ORs’ airflow, and we did it using a simple but data-powerful device. In the last year we have used this data and effectively learned what is or is not causing pathogens in our airflow and infections to our patients.

Learning Objectives:
  • Protect the surgical environment with new design-integration methods beyond temperature, humidity, air exchanges and pressure relationships.
  • Speak to the importance of optimizing laminar flow and ways to visualize airflow. Speak to the importance of optimizing laminar flow and ways to visualize airflow.
  • Measure end users’ impact that have within the surgical environment and recognize when to exclude the building as a potential cause for HAIs.
  • Challenge industry standards and commonly held beliefs for how new and existing OR platforms need to perform mechanically in order to be sterile.
  • N/A
Speaker(s):

Commissioning and Transitioning Your Project to the Owner

Mar 23, 2022 9:45am ‐ Mar 23, 2022 10:45am

Credits: None available.

Occupancy of a new and renovated health care space triggers immediate regulatory and safety requirements including location of emergency shut-off valves, accurate inventory counts, preventive maintenance procedures for equipment, and updated and accurate life safety drawings. As an industry, there has been an increase in the inclusion of end-users in the design process. However, transitioning to operations is an area where increased collaboration with facilities can yield greater results and improved safety. The presentation will include experiences from the perspective of a facilities professional and a consultant. Specific successful and unsuccessful case studies will be presented. Ideas and suggestions for all stakeholders to improve the transition process will be presented. The presenters will use a "fireside chat" format to share their perspectives, to react to each other and engage with the attendees.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify the stakeholders that should be involved in the commissioning process.
  • Describe the benefit to including facility personnel in the transition process.
  • List at least three actions that resulted in a positive transition to ownership.
  • List at least three actions, or inactions, that resulted in an unacceptable transition to ownership.
  • N/A
Speaker(s):