2017 PDC Summit

Mar 12, 2017 ‐ Mar 15, 2017


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Standard: $295.00

Sessions

The Joint Commission: Phase I Standards & Elements of Performance Review

Mar 14, 2017 4:10pm ‐ Mar 14, 2017 5:10pm

Identification: 1793

Credits: None available.

Many changes have stemmed from the CMS adoption of the 2012 editions of NFPA 101: Life Safety Code and NFPA 99: Health Care Facilities Code. Many of these changes are in the Standards and Elements of Performance (EP) the Joint Commission uses to survey health care organizations. This session will review some of the more significant environment of care and life safety changes, including new EPs and those that were modified. This session will also include a brief discussion of the Phase II project, and an opportunity to ask questions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss how the CMS adoption of the 2012 editions of NFPA 101 and NFPA 99 relate to Joint Commission EPs
  • Describe the intent behind some of the new EPs released in January 2017
  • Explain the intent behind EPs that were modified in the January 2017 release
  • Discuss the plan for additional and modified EPs (Phase II) and how those will be evaluated in 2017

Speaker(s):
  • George Mills, MBA, FASHE, CEM, CHFM, CHSP, Director, Department of Engineering, The Joint Commission
Standard: $30.00

How Bed-Free Campuses Meet Strategic Service Demand

Mar 14, 2017 4:10pm ‐ Mar 14, 2017 5:10pm

Identification: 1560

Credits: None available.

Two leading health systems are meeting rising service demand, without deploying new beds. These stand-alone, patient-focused destinations will share how they worked with various demographics to align services and create a care continuum. Learn how strategic vision and proactive building plans can maximize first cost investment and avoid disruption in future phases. Health system leaders will provide specific examples on how they pre-engaged communities, approving agencies, developers, and vested stakeholders in planning and demonstrate how to streamline several levels of input.

Learning Objectives:

  • Integrate lean planning and operational redesign with building design, with no lost time.
  • Discover effective methods for engaging community, users, lean planners, and stakeholders in planning a strategic campus.
  • Engage and gain consensus and approval from diverse community groups in long-range master planning.
  • Plan responsibly for the future and minimize initial cost investment.

Speaker(s):
  • Laura Stillman, Principal, Flad & Associates
  • Bradley Pollitt, AIA, Vice President, Facilities, Shands Healthcare
  • Dave Kistel, Vice President, Facilities Management Support Services, Lee Memorial Health System
  • Liz Dudek, Director of Health Care Affairs, Greenberg Traurig, P.A.
Standard: $30.00

A Design Guide to the Health Care Facilities Code

Mar 14, 2017 4:10pm ‐ Mar 14, 2017 5:10pm

Identification: 1775

Credits: None available.

Walk through NFPA 99: Health Care Facilities Code and the specific implications for designers to comply with the code as recently adopted by CMS. NFPA 99 has become a risk-based document and is applicable to many health care facilities. Compliance now requires a multidisciplinary group. Design teams will have to fully understand the effects of these decisions. This session will point out the specific provisions of which every architect and engineer needs to be aware.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the regulatory path and the need to follow the Health Care Facilities Code.
  • Compare the new document requirements with previous editions of the code.
  • Define the four risk categories applicable to health care projects.
  • Explore the design implications of the risk determinations.

Speaker(s):
  • David A. Dagenais, BS, CHSP, CHFM, FASHE, Director of Plant Operations and Security, Wentworth Douglass Hospital
  • Chad E. Beebe, AIA, Deputy Executive Director of Advocacy, American Society for Healthcare Engineering (ASHE)
Standard: $30.00

GENERAL SESSION:The Surveyors' Perspective: Understanding How Joint Commission Surveyors Conduct Hospital and Ambulatory Surveys

Mar 15, 2017 7:00am ‐ Mar 15, 2017 8:15am

Identification: 1784

Credits: None available.

This session will discuss how Joint Commission surveyors prepare for surveys and explains the new agenda process–including details on the agenda if a Life Safety Code® surveyor arrives with the team on day one or day two of the survey. This session shows how scoring is completed, explains the SAFER matrix, new Project REFRESH pilots, and reviews the new Joint Commission fire drill matrix. The session will also provide tips on successful surveys for the life safety, environment of care, and emergency management issues evaluated during the building tour. Attendees can ask questions during this session to get answers directly from those overseeing Joint Commission Life Safety Code surveyors.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe how Life Safety Code surveyors prepare for surveys
  • Explain step-by-step how Life Safety Code surveyors conducts surveys
  • Discuss new Joint Commission survey process initiatives
  • Implement tips for a successful Life Safety Code survey

Speaker(s):
  • James E. Kendig, MA, CHSP, CHCM, CHEM, LHRM, Field Director, Life Safety, Joint Commission
  • Timothy Markijohn, MBA/MHA, CHFM, CHE, Field Director, Surveyor Management and Development Division of Accreditation & Certification Operations, Joint Commission
Standard: $75.00

Patient Care on the Edge: The Medical Home Model and Serving a Rural Area

Mar 15, 2017 8:30am ‐ Mar 15, 2017 9:30am

Identification: 1470

Credits: None available.

This session will focus on the divergent needs of a population composed of rich and poor and young and old, all with medical needs being satisfied in a rural location by one clinic, and the clinic's future as a patient centered medical home. The panel will review the site and its rich history, its location near the architecturally inspired community of Sea Ranch, the effect of nature, and the underserved medical needs of a diverse community.

  • Explore how population health management affects a community with divergent health care needs and disparate economic means.
  • Plan and design concepts and features that strive to improve throughput and operations and metrics comparing traditional models to an integrated care model.
  • Assess the community benefits of an innovative clinic that unites a community around needs and beliefs and still addresses the IHI Triple Aim.
  • Improve patient satisfaction and metrics expressed in the patient centered medical home model's planning and design features.

Speaker(s):
  • Kevin Day, AIA, LEED, Vice President - Design Principal, HGA Architects and Engineers
Standard: $30.00

Intelligent Health Care Campus Reduces Facility Operations Costs

Mar 15, 2017 8:30am ‐ Mar 15, 2017 9:30am

Identification: 1569

Credits: None available.

This University of Florida Health case study highlights the importance of people and technology in solving health care facility management challenges such as resiliency, staff retirement, energy, and operational efficiency. By defining its intelligent campus strategies through outcomes rather than technology, UF Health has been able to adopt a holistic approach. Outcomes accomplished through this approach include $5 million in savings in the last 5 years, improvement of patient comfort, and reduction of building system alarms by 80 percent.

Learning Objectives:

  • Master the Intelligent Campus concepts and understand the business case for its implementation – possibly at your institution.
  • Discover how the convergence of otherwise disparate systems can save significant operations costs, allowing greater investment in capital improvement and other health care programs.
  • Acquire a clear understanding as to how to implement an Intelligent Campus approach on a campus or in a specific building.
  • Recognize the impact of Internet of Things (IoT) and data on facilities and learn about the job functions you need today.

Speaker(s):
  • Sanjyot Bhusari, PE, CEM, LEED AP, Intelligent Buildings Practice Leader, Affiliated Engineers Inc.
  • Mark Dykes, Project Manager of Energy Utilization, UF Health at Shands Hospital University of Florida
  • Bradley Pollitt, AIA, Vice President, Facilities, Shands Healthcare
Standard: $30.00

AMC Benchmarking Study: Facility Condition Assessment and Asset Management

Mar 15, 2017 8:30am ‐ Mar 15, 2017 9:30am

Identification: 1581

Credits: None available.

This session is intended for health system leaders interested in learning how academic medical centers collect, manage, and leverage facility condition information. The presenters will offer insights based on a benchmarking study initiated by MD Anderson Cancer Center of its peer institutions. Common facility renewal practices will be identified as well as how data from facility condition assessments informs renewal and capital planning decision making. Top trends, best practices, and associated lessons learned from those best practices will be presented.

Learning Objectives:

  • Apply industry survey findings to implement new/improved asset management and facility condition assessment tools and techniques.
  • Identify opportunities to improve approach and processes relating to capital asset and facility planning.
  • Leverage facility condition assessment data to inform strategic facility planning.
  • Gain insights from presenters and other session participants regarding facility condition assessment best practices and lessons learned.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $30.00

The Big Room: Good, Bad and (Sometimes) Ugly

Mar 15, 2017 8:30am ‐ Mar 15, 2017 9:30am

Identification: 1573

Credits: None available.

Co-location–having design and construction team members work together–holds the promise of significant savings in time, dollars, and effort while enhancing the quality of the documents, construction process, and the finished building. This presentation focuses on the Big Room of Banner University Medical Center Tucson. At its heart, co-location entails realignment of practices and priorities from individual organizations to the project. This panel discussion will include project goals, costs, organization, and schedule, as well as outcomes and lessons learned.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the primary goals and challenges of co-location.
  • Appreciate how co-location may contribute to a redistribution of work effort and processes.
  • Recognize the commitment, priorities, and challenges in being a team member in a Big Room.
  • Decide if co-location may be right for your organization and what costs may be incurred.

Moderator(s): Speaker(s):
Standard: $30.00

Universal Prep-Recovery: New Paradigm or Smoke and Mirrors?

Mar 15, 2017 8:30am ‐ Mar 15, 2017 9:30am

Identification: 1561

Credits: None available.

Flexibility is at the forefront of many of the decisions made in health care projects. As treatment and diagnostic modalities move toward a surgical suite model having both prep and recovery functions, multitasking seems to be a logical step. This session will look at the ways a universal prep recovery room could help address organizational goals including patient satisfaction, patient and staff safety, staff efficiency, clinical standardization, and building a brand and market share.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the requirements for both patient preparation and recovery.
  • Assess the benefits and the limitations of the universal model.
  • Explore where the universal room is applicable.
  • Evaluate the effects on patient safety and satisfaction.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $30.00

Better Together: Risk Management and the Physical Environment

Mar 15, 2017 8:30am ‐ Mar 15, 2017 9:30am

Identification: 1434

Credits: None available.

This fast paced, interactive session looks at how medical errors occur, what role the physical environment may play in medical errors, and the importance of interdepartmental teamwork to reduce risk and advance patient safety. Presenters will use video, slides, and audience participation to shine light on how a medical error can occur in a health care setting and how risk management can work with other facility departments to decrease the likelihood of reoccurrence.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify how medical errors occur.
  • Discuss the physical environment's role in medical errors.
  • Explain the concept of human factors and how it relates to the physical environment.
  • Determine how interdepartmental teamwork can decrease the re-occurrence of a medical error.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $30.00
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