ASHE 54th Annual Conference & Technical Exhibition

Aug 7, 2017 ‐ Aug 9, 2017


Standard: $295.00
Members: $195.00

Sessions

Methodology for Analyzing Environmental Quality Indicators (EQIs) in a Dynamic Operating Room Environment

Aug 9, 2017 10:10am ‐ Aug 9, 2017 11:10am

Identification: WED06

Credits: None available.

This panel features team members who developed and executed an air quality testing process for operating rooms. The team includes a board certified surgeon, an air quality expert, a mechanical engineer, and a hospital design and construction expert. The team provides unique perspectives on the quality of the air in operating rooms at different ventilation rates. While there is much discussion on using additional air changes to help reduce surgical site infections, there is little evidence on actual benefits.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe how operating room ventilation works
  • Develop a repeatable and measurable process that provides evidence-based results to help guide code requirements
  • Explain the cost and benefits of different ventilation rates in operating rooms
  • Apply engineering principles to support better clinical and operational outcomes

Speaker(s):
  • Troy Markel, Pediatric Surgeon/Associate Professor, Indiana University Health
  • Jennifer Wagner, PhD and air quality expert, President, Consultant and Lead Scientist, Prism Environmental Health and Safety Solutions
  • Damon G. Greeley, PE, CEM, HFDP, CBCP, EDAC, CHFM, Founder & Managing Partner, Global Health System, Inc./Onsite-LLC
  • John Ostojic, Industrial Hygenist, Artec Environmental Monitoring
  • Tom Gromley, Ph.D, CHC, LEED AP, Associate Professor, MTSU
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Meeting Patient and Staff Satisfaction Goals with Zone Maintenance

Aug 9, 2017 10:10am ‐ Aug 9, 2017 11:10am

Identification: WED07

Credits: None available.

This session presents “zone maintenance,” a successful strategy to manage both patient and caregiver satisfaction. A maintenance technician is assigned to the nursing team to provide immediate assistance with needs in the physical environment; to include inspecting, monitoring, and correcting Life Safety, Environment of Care and Infection control issues. The zone maintenance technicians are responsible for both routine maintenance and immediate needs, and at the end of the day technicians leave with the assurance that they contributed to patient care by keeping their zones code compliant, safe, secure, and comfortable.

Learning Objectives:

  • Create ownership for the zone technician
  • Improve patient satisfaction
  • Establish a team approach with the zone technician, nursing, and housekeeping
  • Be survey ready

Speaker(s):
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

FTEs of the Future: A Guide to Aligning the Right Trend with the Right Skills

Aug 9, 2017 10:10am ‐ Aug 9, 2017 11:10am

Identification: WED09

Credits: None available.

The facilities management workforce continues to age,and the next generation must acquire the skill sets needed to maintain a functioning team. Industry-wide there has been a loss of formal succession planning for skilled trades, which typically leads to the reliance on more outsourced services in skilled trade areas. This session will share experiences with a holistic approach to succession planning including the value of internship programs.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define succession planning and develop a plan to address FTE needs to recruit, train, and build the next generation
  • Identify ways to build an internship program that will ensure you maintain the skill set needed for an in-house model
  • Understand how to use data to build the right partnerships while building internal skill
  • Identify the role and importance communication plays and how employee engagement makes a significant impact on a successful plan

Speaker(s):
  • Matthew Keahey, MBA, National Vice President of Operations, Medxcel Facilities Management
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Commissioning-Informed Design: Engineering Value Not Value Engineering

Aug 9, 2017 10:10am ‐ Aug 9, 2017 11:10am

Identification: WED08

Credits: None available.

Value engineering is often guilty of cutting features needed for reliability, but what if the whole project reviewed were unnecessary? Commissioning is showing that traditional design approaches often treat symptoms rather than provide cures. Using an investigative mind-set, owners can share diagnostic insights with their design team that produce fresh ideas, cut costs, and improve project outcomes. This session will share practical methods for owners and consultants to maximize value by applying commissioning principles early in design.

Learning Objectives:

  • Evaluate why business-as-usual produces costly fixes that fail to address root problems
  • Explore a large hospital’s self-performed approach to improve design with in situ testing
  • Examine a small hospital's team approach to debunk the mystery of a chilled water capacity shortage
  • Adapt a generalized ongoing commissioning method to available resources

Speaker(s):
  • Matthew Rooke, PE, CPMP, Senior Commissioning Engineer, Envinity, Inc.
  • Mark Dykes, Project Manager of Energy Utilization, UF Health at Shands Hospital University of Florida
  • Norman J. Ziemer, PE, CHFM, Director, Facilities Management, Indiana Regional Medical Center
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Decreasing Hospital Energy Consumption While Improving Patient Comfort with Proactive HVAC Analytics and Decision Support

Aug 9, 2017 11:20am ‐ Aug 9, 2017 12:20pm

Identification: WED13

Credits: None available.

Transition to continuous commissioning to improve your building system performance. This session presents a practical example of the essential steps to establish an energy plan, build an energy team, and employ an automatic HVAC fault detection and diagnostic system as strategic decision support to increase energy savings, patient satisfaction, and operational performance. Continuous commissioning gives staff the confidence that they are operating building systems at the optimum levels for comfort and reliability and at the highest energy efficiency.

This session will help you:

  • Embrace a data-driven approach to measuring and verifying performance
  • Prioritize the use of maintenance resources
  • Describe the analytics available to boil big data down to proactive and effective decision support
  • Increase operational excellence while diminishing energy costs and improving patient comfort and satisfaction

Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Emergency Power Basics for Emergency Preparedness

Aug 9, 2017 11:20am ‐ Aug 9, 2017 12:20pm

Identification: WED10

Credits: None available.

The 10-year past chair of the NFPA committee on emergency power supplies discusses emergency power operation and management for the beginning facility manager. The focus is the new CMS emergency preparedness requirements for emergency power systems, along with inspection, testing, maintenance, load assessment, operation, finding and mitigating vulnerabilities, and planning for power failures. The session will provide more than 100 detailed best practices intended to help attendees improve emergency power dependability.

Learning Objectives:

  • List major challenges and benefits of different approaches to inspection, testing, operation, and maintenance
  • Describe processes for finding hidden emergency power system vulnerabilities
  • List major compliance challenges and solutions with emergency power system management
  • Describe the aspects of a comprehensive and CMS-compliant emergency power management program

Speaker(s):
  • David Stymiest, PE, CHFM, CHSP, FASHE, Senior Consultant, Smith Seckman Reid, Inc
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Test Your Code KnowledgeTest Your Code Knowledge

Preview Available

Test Your Code Knowledge

Aug 9, 2017 11:20am ‐ Aug 9, 2017 12:20pm

Identification: WED11

Credits: None available.

Understanding regulatory codes is essential for proper maintenance of a health care facility. Recent editions of the codes have introduced new requirements that can ease the difficulties of maintaining a facility, if used properly. This session serves to reinforce knowledge of long-standing requirements, while providing an introduction to new requirements. Test your knowledge with a live code quiz on NFPA 99, NFPA 101®, and the reference standards, including an open discussion of questions with a lower percentage of correct responses.

Learning Objectives:

  • Apply requirements of the NFPA 99-2012, as adopted by CMS
  • Describe new code requirements in NFPA 101-2012, NFPA 99-2012, and the reference standards
  • Assess personal comprehension of regulatory codes based on correct responses to seminar questions
  • Identify top code code compliance challenges involving various NFPA codes, including recent editions of NFPA 101, NFPA 99, and the reference standards

Speaker(s):
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Uninterruptible Power Systems for Diagnostic and Treatment Facilities

Aug 9, 2017 11:20am ‐ Aug 9, 2017 12:20pm

Identification: WED12

Credits: None available.

Imaging equipment used in diagnostic and treatment facilities benefits greatly when supplied by uninterruptible power sources (UPS). Such sources provide voltage regulation and protection from power sags and swells and momentary interruptions, and prevent the loss of data and disruptions. Stand-alone UPS systems are costly for maintenance, operation, and floor space allocations. Using a central and modular flywheel system for the UPS source will have a payback of five years or less when compared to standard battery-type UPS systems.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify alternatives to battery-type UPS units
  • Assess life cycle costs of UPS alternatives
  • Evaluate facility benefits of centralized UPS sources
  • Develop schematic designs for centralized UPS sources

Speaker(s):
  • Sean J. Kozielec, P.E., Senior Engineer, JPT - Consultants-Architects-Engineers-Planners
  • Brent Spangler, Senior Electrical Project Manager, JPT - Consultants-Architects-Engineers-Planners
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Master Planning the Entire Building—An Integrated Architectural and Engineering Approach

Aug 9, 2017 11:20am ‐ Aug 9, 2017 12:20pm

Identification: WED14

Credits: None available.

A master plan cannot thrive on architecture alone. A complete facility planning effort cannot consist of only programmed architectural spaces, and the building cannot function without engineering systems. Through case studies, the engineering and architectural team show how integrating engineering efforts into a master plan effort will result in a better utilized space and design. Attendees will leave armed with a process checklist and tools to understand and explain the importance of including engineering in a master plan design effort.

Learning Objectives:

  • Determine options for engineering systems to complement architectural program needs
  • Evaluate facility needs for new, modified, or upgraded engineering systems and planning
  • Identify opportunities to incorporate engineering master planning efforts
  • Engage all stake holders of a facility to actively participate in master planning

Speaker(s):
  • Dennis Vonasek, AIA, NCARB, ACHA, CID, Architect/Healthcare Principal, HGA Architects and Engineers
  • Jeff Harris, PE, LEED AP, Director of Mechanical Engineering, HGA Architects and Engineers
  • Krista McDonald Biason, P.E., Electrical Engineer, HGA Architects and Engineers
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Future Years Capital FundingFuture Years Capital Funding

Preview Available

Future Years Capital Funding

Aug 9, 2017 11:20am ‐ Aug 9, 2017 12:20pm

Identification: WED15

Credits: None available.

Predicting future funding can seem like guesswork. This session will look at how the Department of Defense projects future funding requirements for Congressional funding. With the use of the COE-CERL BUILDER program, this session will address individual and large portfolio needs within the Department of Defense and how to use a decision model that addresses risk, code compliance, equipment life cycle replacement, and future work plans. Attendees will learn to balance current and future facilities needs with budget needs.

Learning Objectives:

  • Determine what information is required for future funding of capital projects
  • Learn how to calculate ROI for capital projects
  • Use a weighted decision model for project prioitization
  • Address short-term, mid-term, and long-term capital projects and funding needs

Speaker(s):
  • Roy Hirchak, CHFM, Chief, Operations and Maintenance, Defense Health Agency
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00
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