2018 PDC Summit

Mar 25, 2018 ‐ Mar 28, 2018


Standard: $295.00
Standard: $195.00

Sessions

3D Cameras for Hospital Construction and Facility Management

Mar 27, 2018 4:10pm ‐ Mar 27, 2018 5:10pm

Identification: 2045

Credits: None available.

3D cameras can create images during construction that will make life easier for owners and facility managers. This presentation will demonstrate the use of a high-end 3D camera for a new hospital project. A camera was used to form a detailed composite of the building before the walls were closed. The details and cost of creating high-quality imagery will be discussed and examples given of situations where a 3D camera could have prevented operating issues and made warranty discussions easier.

Learning Objectives:

  • Judge the usefulness of 3D imagery for a specific project or building.
  • Assess the cost of creating high-quality 3D imagery using a particular platform.
  • Discuss the things a facility manager will be concerned about during ongoing operation.
  • Describe the need to plan ahead during construction to avoid operating issues and warranty complications.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Gender and Cultural Equity in Health Care PDC – An honest discussion

Mar 27, 2018 4:10pm ‐ Mar 27, 2018 5:10pm

Identification: 2264

Credits: None available.

Training for technical careers is reflecting more diversity, but we are not seeing the same trend in the design and construction industry. This interactive session is part of a continuing conversation about the current state of leadership. The diverse team of presenters will provide statistics and findings from ASHE surveys that have focused on equity issues. The goal is to share experiences, concerns, and strategies for a diverse workforce and how to engage the best and brightest talent.

Learning Objectives:

  • Review statistics of women and minorities in the construction field.
  • Discuss benefits and challenges to attain equity in leadership roles.
  • Engage attendees in select topics regarding workplace challenges.
  • Report out to the group a summary of individual tabletop discussions to evaluate alignment.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Avoiding Disaster: The Texas Medical Center Story

Mar 28, 2018 7:00am ‐ Mar 28, 2018 8:15am

Identification: 2260

Credits: None available.

When Tropical Storm Allison hit the medical center in 2001 it caused hundreds of millions of dollars in damage to these facilities. Through careful planning, design, and construction, area hospitals invested in a system that was put to the test on August 24, 2017, when Category 4 Hurricane Harvey made landfall, causing more than $100 billion in damages to southwestern Texas. Even after more than 40 inches of rain, these hospitals were able to maintain operations and care for patients.

Learning Objectives:

  • Compare the impacts of Tropical Storm Allison and Hurricane Harvey on Texas Medical Center.
  • Describe the process that ensued after Tropical Storm Allison to ensure damages would be limited to future events.
  • Describe the mitigation techniques used and the goals of the program in developing the flood mitigation network at Texas Medical Center.
  • Discuss the value the system has on the community’s confidence and the commitment of the healthcare providers.

Speaker(s):
  • Terry Scott, MBA CHFM CHSP SASHE, System Director Engineering, Memorial Hermann Northwest/Southwest Hospitals
  • Bert Gumeringer, CHFM,FASHE, Asst. Vice President- Facilities Operations, Texas Children's Hospital
  • Michael Hatton, MBA, CHFM, RPA, SMA, SASHE, System Executive, Memorial Hermann Hospital
  • Tim Peglow, PE, SASHE, Associate Vice President Patient Care and Prevention Facilities, UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center;
Standard: $75.00
Members: $45.00

FGI and ACEP: New Ideas in Emergency Design

Mar 28, 2018 8:30am ‐ Mar 28, 2018 9:30am

Identification: 1991

Credits: None available.

This session builds on the Facility Guidelines Institute workshop conducted during the 2016 PDC Summit. The session will apply the principles of design thinking, coupled with deep clinical expertise, to identify pressing needs and opportunities at the intersection of planning and delivery. In this session, a “Shark Tank” format will be used to explain the principles of design to demonstrate how the FGI uses these tools to improve Guidelines development and to test new ideas for the emergency department.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the basic principles of design thinking.
  • Review how FGI is evolving and how it is using design thinking and clinical expertise to improve future Guidelines content.
  • Gain exposure to new ideas for emergency services design.
  • Have fun shaping a further research agenda for the FGI by helping to pick a best topic.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Infection Prevention: Collaborations in Design and Construction

Mar 28, 2018 8:30am ‐ Mar 28, 2018 9:30am

Identification: 1954

Credits: None available.

Infection transmission is a constant concern in medical settings, posing threats to patients and staff and negatively affecting the organization’s bottom line. Projects offer opportunities to support safety and infection prevention but the complexity of design and construction can be fraught with obstacles, especially when translating design to construction documents. This presentation addresses the facility implications in planning for infection transmission prevention, recommendations for developing an infection prevention team, and insights from project leaders.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss the programmatic implications of access to personal protective equipment.
  • Identify two areas where gaps in information affecting infection prevention can occur when design documents are translated into construction documents.
  • List at least four departments/roles that should be represented on an infection prevention team.
  • Explain two infection prevention implications of technology additions to inpatient rooms.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Cardiovascular Service Line Design: Improving Patient Care Delivery

Mar 28, 2018 8:30am ‐ Mar 28, 2018 9:30am

Identification: 2015

Credits: None available.

  • Vertically integrated cardiovascular service lines provide better coordinated patient care, with improved outcomes. Integrating a cardiovascular service line requires thoughtful redesign of operational processes around the patient’s needs. The service line model also requires investments in equipment and facilities. Properly designed facilities reinforce operational models and elevate how patients experience their care. This session provides an overview of MidMichigan Health’s vision for a patient-focused cardiovascular service line and demonstrates how the organization partnered lean workflow redesign with progressive facility approaches.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe how an integrated service line approach can provide a better patient experience throughout the entire continuum of care.
  • Explore a joint facility design and operational approach to cardiovascular service line organization.
  • Evaluate how architecture enhances the clinical operations of a cardiovascular service line.
  • Differentiate your organization’s strategic vision and brand its clinical expertise through a cardiovascular service line design.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Patient-Centered Programming: Form, Function, Economy, and Time

Mar 28, 2018 8:30am ‐ Mar 28, 2018 9:30am

Identification: 1841

Credits: None available.

The patient-centered aspects of health care delivery begin with experienced functional programming. Assessing the clinical and operational needs with those of the patient and staff is a balance of function, form, economy, and time. The ability to apply structured functional programming in the context of a campus master plan is the most appropriate and proven approach. This discussion conveys the value-added attributes of the full continuum of planning for gaps in the system, recruitment, retention, and process change.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define the most effective method of functional programming and outline the best methods to determine the key planning units to achieve a safe patient-centric environment .
  • Define how programming differs between facilities needing to be upgraded and facilities and programs starting from scratch and what the regulatory issues entail.
  • Outline the priority attributes and regulatory requirements of a functional program within a health care delivery system, compared to a standalone acute care hospital .
  • Determine the value-added attributes of a functional program and whether standardization prototypes should be considered.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Without Interruption: Rebuilding an Occupied 482-Bed Patient Tower

Mar 28, 2018 8:30am ‐ Mar 28, 2018 9:30am

Identification: 2074

Credits: None available.

Many hospitals must decide what to do with older buildings with significant infrastructure and interior quality issues. Providence St. Vincent Medical Center faced this challenge with its 482-bed main tower. This session will illustrate the collaborative and transparent design process that enabled the team to evaluate multiple options, and how complex decisions were made. Solutions included big concept moves to micro details. As a result, a 40-year-old fully occupied nursing tower was rebuilt to serve patients for another 40 years.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the key decision points, opportunities, and issues involved in updating all the building systems of a large four-decade-old nursing tower.
  • Explain how a collaborative and transparent design process can efficiently solve complex problems.
  • Describe how to mitigate the impact of major and invasive renovations on patients.
  • Demonstrate how multiple-phase projects can continually improve on design and construction results.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Sterile Processing Department Design and HVAC Considerations

Mar 28, 2018 9:40am ‐ Mar 28, 2018 10:40am

Identification: 2028

Credits: None available.

The requirements for sterile processing facilities were significantly revised in the Facility Guidelines Institute’s 2018 Guidelines. The new hospital and outpatient facility documents provide expanded guidance for designing these areas in a manner that supports and encourages compliance with guidelines for cleaning, decontaminating, and sterilizing surgical instruments. The session will cover when a two-room sterile processing facility is required and when a single-room sterile processing facility is acceptable as well as ventilation requirements to support a dirty-to-clean workflow.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss the perspectives of infection preventionists on what architects and engineers need to know to provide the safest, most efficient environment for sterile processing.
  • Describe the extent to which each profession’s perspective is addressed in AORN’s Recommended Practices for a Safe Environment of Care Part 2 and FGI’s Guidelines.
  • Describe the design engineer’s perspectives as they approach initial planning for sterile processing environments in hospitals and outpatient surgery facilities.
  • Explain the latest ventilation requirements for sterile processing and the Joint HVAC Task Force’s recommendations on compliance.

Speaker(s):
  • Douglas S. Erickson, FASHE, CHFM, HFDP, CHC, CEO, Facility Guidelines Institute
  • Paula Wright, RN, BSN, CIC, Director, Infection Control Unit, Massachasetts General Hospital
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00

Improving Patient Care: The Intersection of Culture and Evidence-Based Design

Mar 28, 2018 9:40am ‐ Mar 28, 2018 10:40am

Identification: 2044

Credits: None available.

The Indian Health Service has created two new healthcare facilities: Kayenta Health Center and Fort Yuma Health Care Center. Both facilities prioritize preventative care, contradicting the perceived hierarchy of inpatient care over outpatient and therapy services. Instead, each facility emphasizes cultural traditions and puts wellness first. This session will demonstrate how evidence-based design, a cultural understanding of wellness, and state-of-the-art health care can intersect to improve patient outcomes and support IHS’s proactive mission.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe Indian Health Service’s health care initiative.
  • Evaluate how services are accommodated in each facility and how they are improving outcomes.
  • Assess how each facility responds to the culture of the tribes served.
  • Explore ancient healthcare and wellness traditions and how they coincide with current thinking about wellness.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $30.00
Members: $15.00
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