ASHE 56th Annual Conference & Technical Exhibition

Jul 14, 2019 ‐ Jul 17, 2019


Standard: $295.00
Members: $195.00

Sessions

Hospitals Investing in Resilience: Protecting Lives and Margins

Jul 16, 2019 9:45am ‐ Jul 16, 2019 10:45am

Identification: 1168

Credits: None available.

Hospitals are on the frontline of climate change, managing the health impacts and costs from more frequent extreme weather events, such as hurricanes or wildfires, and increased diseases. Hospitals across the country are stepping up to take action to make their facilities and communities more resilient. In this session, four leading health systems will share how they are implementing innovative climate solutions in a three-pillar framework of mitigation, resilience and leadership to drive the transformation to climate-smart health care.

Learning Objectives:

  • Review recent climate reports and their effects on the health care sector.
  • Explore strategies to scale energy efficiency reductions across facilities.
  • Learn how to use the HHS Toolkit Primary Protection: Enhancing Health Care Resilience for a Changing Climate.
  • Understand how to make a compelling case to leadership about and make progress towards resiliency goals.

Speaker(s):
  • Larry Rubin, CEM, CPE, CHFM, CHSP, CBCP, CBEP, M.Ed, Senior Director Facilities Management, Cleveland Clinic
  • Jim Prince, Director of Energy and Facility Performance Excellence, Manager of Energy Management, Medexcel
  • Sarah Spengeman, PhD, Associate Director, US Climate and Health, Health Care Without Harm
  • Seth J. Baruch, National Director Energy & Utilities, National Facilities Services, Kaiser Permanente
  • David S. Burson, Senior Project Manager Real Estate and Facilities, Partners HealthCare Systems, Inc.

Powered for Patients DHS NIPP Security & Resilience

Jul 16, 2019 9:45am ‐ Jul 16, 2019 10:45am

Identification: 3014

Credits: None available.

In addition to causing serious injuries to and fatalities in the general population, Hurricanes Katrina, Sandy and Matthew impaired hospital emergency power systems, further harming patients. The power systems suffered failures that ranged from debilitating to catastrophic, triggered by mechanical problems, extreme flooding or a lack of fuel. The partial or total loss of emergency power at numerous hospitals during Hurricanes Sandy and Matthew triggered emergency evacuations, exposing patients and staff to safety and health risks. Powered for Patients has received Department of Homeland Security funding to tap the powerful yet under-leveraged fault detection and automated reporting technology added to an increasing number of hospital emergency power systems. This technology provides real-time alerts to facility staff and service providers at the first sign of a threat to emergency power. The DHS-funded project seeks to provide these real-time alerts to government officials and utilities when emergency power is threatened during an extended power outage. This early warning is critical in enabling government and utilities to accelerate response to a stricken facility. This session will review the DHS NIPP Security & Resilience Challenge Project, detail ASHE members currently participating and highlight opportunities for hospital engagement in the project.

Learning Objectives:

  • Distinguish between advanced fault detection and automated reporting technology connected to emergency power systems, and NFPA 110 required annunciator panels on hospital emergency power systems.
  • Understand the relationship between fault detection and automated reporting technology and hospital Building Automation and Management Systems.
  • Explain the value of enabling accelerated government and utility response at the first sign of a threat to emergency power during disasters through the Power PIONEER Dashboard or via other means.
  • Engage in the Powered for Patients DHS NIPP Security & Resilience Challenge project.

Speaker(s):
  • Eric Cote, Project Director, Powered for Patients
  • Jonathan Flannery, MHSA, CHFM, FASHE, FACHE, Senior Associate Director of Advocacy, American Society for Healthcare Engineering (ASHE)

TED Talk- certification: Second round if needed

Jul 16, 2019 11:00am ‐ Jul 16, 2019 12:00pm

Identification: tt1

Credits: None available.


Ted Talk- Energy To Care Video Shoot

Jul 16, 2019 12:30pm ‐ Jul 16, 2019 1:30pm

Identification: tt2

Credits: None available.


Ted Talk Research Video ShootTed Talk Research Video Shoot

Preview Available

Ted Talk Research Video Shoot

Jul 16, 2019 1:30pm ‐ Jul 16, 2019 2:00pm

Identification: tt3

Credits: None available.


Your Trash Is Risky Business: How to Ensure Strong Privacy and Compliance Within Your Waste Stream

Jul 16, 2019 2:00pm ‐ Jul 16, 2019 3:00pm

Identification: 1026

Credits: None available.

Even companies with robust privacy and compliance programs would be shocked to discover what ends up in their trash. Think about how much your organization spent in the last year to ensure your technology systems comply with GDPR. All that work could be undone by throwing away the wrong item.

In this presentation we’ll take an interactive deep dive into downstream data using quantitative information and qualitative observations to drive organizational waste programs.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the importance of auditing waste.
  • Improve diversion, regulatory compliance, and cost savings with a waste audit.
  • Discover how to leverage the health care industry’s unique benefits from waste audits.
  • Identify the key factors in conducting a successful and systematic waste audit.

Speaker(s):
  • Lani Aviado, Sustainability Services Manager, ENGIE Insight
  • Chelsi Tryon, Compliance & Sustainability Manager, ENGIE Insight

Building a Complete COOP (Continuity of Operations Plan)

Jul 16, 2019 2:00pm ‐ Jul 16, 2019 3:00pm

Identification: 1052

Credits: None available.

This session will provide both a content outline and resources to use in the development of a Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP). Terms and topics will be reviewed for inclusion in the plan. The difference between recovery planning and COOP will be highlighted, and its rationale and value will be explained.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the difference between continuity of operations and recovery.
  • Identify required and optional content for the Continuity of Operations Plan.
  • Discuss the value of the Continuity of Operations Plan.
  • Develop a Continuity of Operations Plan for your organization.

Speaker(s):
  • Susan B McLaughlin, CHSP, FASHE, MT (ASCP) SC, CHFM, Managing Director, MSL Healthcare Partners

Collaborative Approach = Collective Success

Jul 16, 2019 2:00pm ‐ Jul 16, 2019 3:00pm

Identification: 1054

Credits: None available.

Collaborative Construction Methodologies start at the beginning of the project and continue well into the post-occupancy phase. The Lauritzen Outpatient Center (LOC) at Nebraska Medicine is an exemplary example of a collaborative team approach that included the owner, over 100 staff members, design team and contractor. This session begins with a simulation of the Lean 3P workshop utilized during the project and transitions into a discussion of the collaborative process. The owner will identify both the positive aspects and challenges encountered during this non-traditional delivery process. The Architect/Design team will present the process developed specifically for this project including a video of the 3P workshop. The Design and Construction team will discuss how the innovative construction methodologies were implemented together. The team will share visualization and communication tools used during project phases and conclude with reflections on key elements that led to success two years into occupancy.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify pre-design methods that ensure collaboration throughout the entire project.
  • Build consensus through the design phases.
  • Describe methods to engage the owner and design and construction teams.
  • Recognize reflections and recommendations two years into building occupancy.

Speaker(s):

Analysis of Door Latch Failures and Recommendations for Mitigation and Compliance

Jul 16, 2019 2:00pm ‐ Jul 16, 2019 3:00pm

Identification: 1148

Credits: None available.

ASHE's review accreditation survey data reveals that door latching citations are the number one issue in hospital surveys. A new study in collaboration with Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association and The Center for Health Design examines the causes for the failures. The requirements will be compared to the research to determine to what extent doors that do not latch should be reported as a survey finding. Once the problem has been properly identified, potential design, operational, hardware, and maintenance solutions will be offered to reduce the number of survey findings. The ultimate goal of the research and the application of the research will be to significantly reduce the number of findings related to door latching in hospitals.

Join a panel of experts to discuss the findings and to ask questions about your projects and facilities.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the requirements pertaining to the 2010 edition of NFPA 80: Standard for Fire Doors and Other Opening Protectives.
  • Identify when latching of doors is required in hospitals.
  • Examine survey data and work order information to identify three primary causes for door latching failures.
  • Apply study findings to decrease door latch failures and citations.

Speaker(s):
  • Lynn Kenney, Senior Analyst, Advocacy Team, ASHE
  • William E. Koffel, PE, FSFPE, President, Koffel Associates, Inc.
  • Ellen Taylor, AIA, Director of Research, The Center for Health Design
  • Jonathan Flannery, MHSA, CHFM, FASHE, FACHE, Senior Associate Director of Advocacy, American Society for Healthcare Engineering (ASHE)

How Facility Master Planning Positively Impacted the Patient Experience

Jul 16, 2019 2:00pm ‐ Jul 16, 2019 3:00pm

Identification: 1169

Credits: None available.

In 2010, Stamford Hospital embarked on a Facility Master Plan which involved expanding the organization's footprint from 17 to 32 acres, development of a 35,000 SF central utility plant, a 95,000 SF medical office building and a 640,000 SF patient care tower. During the process, the charge was to minimize disruption to patient, visitors and staff, despite the numerous utility shutdowns and several years of reconfiguring the campus. This session will explore how investing efforts in a master plan led to positive impacts on the patient experience.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define how the Facilities Management Team created the Facility Master Plan with the goal of creating a more positive patient experience, particularly the plans and actions put into place and the composition of the teams responsible for planning them.
  • Discuss how hospital leadership engaged local government and community groups in the planning process, with focus on the engagement of the Patient and Family Advisory Council.
  • Illustrate how planning efforts to improve patient experience tie into improved HCAHPS scores, including examples of modifications to plans, workflows and technology to improve HCAHPS.
  • Review lessons learned and explore the importance of steps taken to mitigate any negative outcomes in a positive patient experience.

Speaker(s):
  • Deborah Fedeli, BA, FABC, Director, Patient-Centered Services , Stamford Health
  • Sarah Sanders, MSN, RN, NE-BC, Clinical Operations Director, Emergency Department, Critical Care, Pulmonary and Respiratory, Stamford Health
  • Michael Smeriglio, MBA, FABC, Executive Director, Facilities Management, Stamford Health
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