Major Proposed Changes to NFPA 99 2024 Edition 

Credits: None available.

We will walk though the major proposed changes to the National Fire Protection Association’s NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code, in the 2024 edition. The justifications and oppositions to the changes will be reviewed. The intent of this presentation is to provide information for attendees to make an informed decision on the updates if they choose to vote at the NFPA Technical Session in June of 2023.

Learning Objectives:
  • Review the NFPA process of adoption.
  • Discuss the impact of the major changes in these chapters.
  • Identify the major updates to Chapter 5, 11 and 15.  
  • Identify the major updates to Chapters 1 to 4.

Medical Equipment and Technology Forum

Credits: None available.

The Medical Equipment / Technology Forum is a platform for the interaction and conversation about leading edge technology among owners, architects, engineers, facility managers, contractors, equipment and technology planners and vendors. Today’s healthcare facilities are challenged with more connected devices than ever. Panelists will provide insights of latest strategies and how Owners are making decisions at an increased pace for assuring connectivity and investments in systems that improve the quality and access to care for sustainable community health care.

Learning Objectives: This interactive discussion will explore the various aspects of executing a project in today’s dynamic workplace from Planning, Design and Construction. How are teams managing the impact of changing technology throughout the course of a major project. Panelists will highlight 3 building/project types and discuss the challenges through the design and construction phases of a project.
Learning Objectives:
  • Understand Owner decision making considerations throughout the continuum of a project.
  • Identify early planning strategiesfor success in implementing technology integration in design and   construction.
  • Explore different aspects of technology adoption in various typologies.
  • Vision the future opportunities of continued convergence of technology and environment.

Healthcare Owners Roundtable: Pressing Issues in 2023

Credits: None available.

The Health Care Owners Roundtable is a platform for health care administrators, operators, and design and construction leaders to openly exchange ideas with each other as well as engage with planning, design and construction professionals. Through a moderated discussion and active audience participation, this session will provide opportunities to better understand the pressing issues that are on the owners’ minds. It will create an environment for all participants to learn from each other and help us structure our design and construction industry to serve the needs of health care providers and owners.The Health Care Owners Roundtable is a platform for health care administrators, operators, and design and construction leaders to openly exchange ideas with each other as well as engage with planning, design and construction professionals. Through a moderated discussion and active audience participation, this session will provide opportunities to better understand the pressing issues that are on the owners’ minds. It will create an environment for all participants to learn from each other and help us structure our design and construction industry to serve the needs of health care providers and owners.
Learning Objectives:
  • Become familiar with owner perspectives on key current issues in health care design, construction and operations.
  • Discuss multiple approaches for soliciting professional services and selecting project delivery methodologies.
  • Examine relevant project case studies and success stories experienced by the panelists.
  • Explore collaborative approaches for multi-stakeholder collaborations and their influence on project success.

Opening Session, Awards & Keynote: Leading and Innovating through Sustainability

Credits: None available.

Drastic changes in the business landscape and societal expectations means leaders need to rapidly innovate. Where can you get new tools to successfully innovate? Within the growing field of sustainability. Business leaders at Procter & Gamble to BlackRock, Owens Corning and other Fortune 500 use sustainability to change how they serve their customers, operate profitably, and manage risk within their core products. How can you achieve better outcomes for our collective future while taking into account your business’ unique needs? How will you as a leader need to adapt to capture sustainable opportunities? How do you get ahead of the environmental, social and governance regulations that will shape your business? Join Chrissa Pagitsas, author of Chief Sustainability Officers At Work and former head of ESG at Fannie Mae as she brings to light lessons learned from Fortune 500 executives and her own experience building a $50 billion dollar green bond business to generate revenue growth and deliver positive impact through core business products and services.
Learning Objectives:
  • Recognize how sustainability leaders at Fortune 500 companies have expanded their business lines to capture both economic value and environmental and social impact.
  • Explore the leadership qualities that you can apply to encourage sustainability practices and find new opportunities for business growth.
  • Consider how to engage now with the fast-moving sustainability regulatory environment to influence the governance activities you’ll be responding to over the next twenty years.
  • Discuss how to define near-, mid-, and long-term sustainability priorities and take action to get them started now.

Harnessing Team Morale to Achieve Extraordinary Results

Credits: None available.

A global pandemic and dramatically reduced project schedule at the 75% mark were just two of many challenges for the team on the 500,000 SF, 13-story Duke Health Central Tower at Duke University Medical Center project, but their skilled collaboration and resiliency in the face of unknown circumstances ultimately ensured project success. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the primary safety, design and emotional considerations when building health care facilities with an eye toward future high-risk scenarios. What strategies can other hospitals apply to render safe and successful outcomes? Representatives from Duke Health Facilities, Perkins&Will, Skanska and RMF Engineering will share lessons learned and best practices from a holistic perspective, highlighting how our best planning efforts must be combined with team resilience in order to adapt to unforeseen conditions and achieve the extraordinary.
Learning Objectives:
  • Consider how phased occupancy approaches and other project delivery strategies can be applied to address challenges facing the healthcare industry in today’s market
  • Assess design considerations for building resiliency into post-pandemic projects.
  • Identify strategies for managing a project team’s emotional expectations to boost morale, assuage fear, and use consensus and motivation to drive results.  
  • Explore best practices for clear communication, seamless coordination and superior problem-solving within a volatile environment.

Hey Alexa, How Can Hospitals Use Intelligent Lighting?

Credits: None available.

Common automation tools in the modern-day smart home, like Alexa and Siri, have introduced us to more simplicity and user comfort in our everyday lives. With our phones or voices, we can control lighting, temperature, and other building systems. Intelligent lighting is also quickly becoming a versatile design component when planning health care facilities, capable of transforming clinical programs and connecting built environments. Learn how one hospital is integrating intelligent lighting into their facilities.
Learning Objectives:
  • Identify key considerations for developing lighting standards to promote system flexibility. 
  •  Recognize the benefits of real-time location systems and how they can support team member and guest safety and welfare in a health care facility.  
  • Describe future-forward lighting and control strategies to improve patient and user well-being. 
  • Provide ideas for interview questions for the development of lighting systems based on post-occupancy reviews, and user/family mockup feedback.

Prototyping 2.0: On-Site Prefabrication Minimizes Risk, Speeds Delivery

Credits: None available.

Skilled labor shortages, supply chain issues, material shortages, and quickly rising fuel prices are amplifying market instability and increasing the risk of building projects for health care systems, architects and builders. Join us for a case study presentation on Mercy King Mills Hospital and how on-site prefabrication has helped Bon Secours Mercy Health, GBBN and Danis Construction manage the risks, costs, and schedule of a large medical center project. This session will highlight a large effort to standardize quality across the client’s built environment through a system of architectural prototypes. Next, the OACM team will describe the physical constraints of deploying a 16,000 SF portable manufacturing facility on-site to industrialize construction of 25% of the building’s critical components. Learn how this innovation hedged market instability and increased labor utilization by 62% while also addressing the skilled labor shortage risk. Also, hear how the owner established a project culture and team environment that encouraged innovation and resiliency.
Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the strategic owner decisions made that established a project culture and team environment of innovation and resiliency on the Mercy Kings Mills Hospital project.
  • Differentiate between traditional prefabrication and on-site industrialized construction and how this innovation can hedge market instability, increase labor utilization and minimize skilled labor shortage risk.
  • Develop design and construction efficiencies as an integrated team to help reduce risks for health care systems, architects and builders.
  • Identify the benefits of multiscale prototyping as a design solution to standardize quality and building standards across a client’s system. 

LLUMC: Monumental Building for Body, Mind and Spirit

Credits: None available.

In 2021, the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) opened its doors to a new medical campus, making it the second largest hospital in California at 992,000 GSF. This project began with the realization that the iconic cloverleaf hospital would not meet seismic safety in 2020, it quickly grew to design & construct a state-of-the-art medical facility that focuses on mental, spiritual & physical health for children & adults in alignment with the vision of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Panelists representing owner, architect & contractor. Adventists’ beliefs, clinical voices and lessons learned from the pandemic and seismic safety were combined on this project. The adult & children’s hospital towers look & feel different, inside & out, thanks to the design. Doctors used virtual reality therapy to help young patients understand & feel comfortable with the construction happening outside their windows. Leave understanding of how to:

Create a collaborative environment to incorporate owners’ needs, clinical voices and their vision into design.
Use state-of-the-art technology and modern therapies to help all stakeholders now and in the future.
Plan & build a health care facility for healing the whole body, spirit and mind while also being structurally seismic-safe.
Learning Objectives:
  • Explain how to incorporate clinical voices into a health care construction project design while building a safe and structurally sound environment.
  •  Describe virtual reality therapy and how it can be used as part of the construction process to help patients cope with noise & stress of building while hospitals are under construction. 
  • State ideas to design hospitals to focus on “whole moments,” including designing in elements, such as natural daylight, nature, patient care best practices and noise reduction.
  • Assess when to use a variety of building materials, inside and outside, to create a separate look and feel for different patients, such as adult care versus children’s care.

Hospital Construction Projects — What Accrediting Organizations Want To Know

Credits: None available.

Construction projects in hospitals present many challenges, and having to comply with the requirements of your accreditation organization adds an additional layer of oversight. This session will help to provide attendees with a better understanding of what accreditation organizations (AOs) are looking for in regarding construction projects, from preconstruction requirements to closeout documents. Requirements and recommendations from the National Fire Protection Association’s NFPA 101, Life Safety Code; NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code; FGI Guidelines for Design and Construction of Hospitals; and the CDC will be reviewed along with documentation requirements/recommendations. Some of the more common instances of nonconformance along with causes will be explored. Attendees of this session will be better prepared to provide a safe environment of their patients, staff and visitors, both through practice and documentation of continuous readiness.
Learning Objectives:
  • Identify the requirements for construction projects in hospitals. 
  • Prepare for accreditation organization surveys with regard to construction activities. 
  • Coordinate preconstruction assessment activates between multiple.
  • Recognize pitfalls and potential shortcomings regarding construction projects.

Demystifying How to Perform a GHG Inventory

Credits: None available.

Recently, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a challenge for U.S. health care systems to commit to reducing their greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions by 50% by 2030 and 100% by 2050. Over 60 organizations have already signed on and are setting goals and motivated to make progress. However, many organizations are now grappling with: Where do I begin? The first step is to measure the organization’s own carbon footprint by completing a GHG inventory. A good inventory illustrates the information an organization needs to benchmark its impact, make an educated commitment, set achievable goals and prioritize reduction efforts for greatest impact. Nonprofit health care system Atrium Health (recently merged with Advocate Aurora Health) is on this measuring step in the journey. This session will step through the measuring process, using real, timely examples from Atrium’s journey.
Learning Objectives:
  • Recognize the differences between Scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions.
  • Identify organizational boundaries for a GHG inventory. 
  • Describe the overall GHG inventory process.  
  • List emissions sources within organizational boundaries.