Leveraging Operational Data to Defend Strategic Infrastructure Investment

Credits: None available.

National benchmark data suggests that approximately 45% of infrastructure assets have exceeded industry expected useful life, a massive accumulation of deferred maintenance risk. Experts expect this figure to increase over the next two to five years as the financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and other economic factors continue to negatively impact investment decisions. Knowing the different kinds of buckets that exist is a good first step, but what is the right balance of investment in each to achieve success? Chief financial officers make decisions based not only on project-level return on investment but also by looking at the balance sheet, income statement and overall financial health of the organization. What if we can construct the same view for the facility? Let’s change the way we tell our story. Do you know how much to spend on each of your buckets?
Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the history of these two documents, and how they were adopted to become enforceable in our healthcare facilities as a means to ensure the health and safety of patients.
  • Recognize how various chapters of the two documents apply to different areas within their facilities depending on the risk involved.
  • Comprehend how the requirements for older facilities are different than the requirements for new.
  • Describe how NFPA 99 and NFPA 101 utilize other codes and standards as referenced documents, making them enforceable as well.

NFPA 101 and NFPA 99: An Introduction for Facility Managers

Credits: None available.

The healthcare facilities industry is subject to a lot of different codes and standards, many of which stem from the two major ones: NFPA 101 Life Safety Code and NFPA 99 Health Care Facilities Code. In this session, participants will get an introduction to these two documents, why they are enforced in our facilities, and a high-level overview of what they include.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
Learning Objectives:
  • Establish site-specific action steps to make progress on a sustainability plan.
  • Build a cross-functional team to work collaboratively to achieve sustainability goals.
  • Construct a compelling business case to support decision-making and buy-in.
  • Strengthen communication through shared language that are core to each specialization.

What’s Behind Your Walls? Assessing Systems Failure Risk

Credits: None available.

Few catastrophes can be more devastating to health care facility operations than large-scale failure of mechanical or utilities systems. Largely unseen, these systems can be overlooked and underestimated. Planned maintenance shutdowns are disruptive to the budget, bed availability and primary mission of patient care, but an unanticipated breakdown is potentially be disastrous. Do you know the extent, condition and failure risk of your nonvisible systems? Health care administrators, finance officers, and facilities managers will benefit from this fireside chat. Attendees will hear a first-hand account of how Penn Medicine is proactively assessing and addressing risk through comprehensive analyses of their visible and nonvisible systems. See how they are using live data to support their maintenance operations and capital planning budgetary requests to keep projects on schedule, andlearn how that data has influenced their strategies to mitigate risk of unexpected failures. By the end of this session, participatnts will have insight and tools to get a preliminary analysis started.
Learning Objectives:
  • Analyze the challenges of creating a cohesive operational model while integrating staff from multiple facilities with different cultures and processes and the synergistic opportunity it creates to improve outcomes for babies and mothers in the state of Indiana.
  • Discuss the challenges of renovating within a predetermined footprint to create and integrate efficient operational workflows.
  • Review the process of bringing electrical equipment systems into operation in a phased plan to prevent overloads that could impact service to other areas on campus.
  • Evaluate the challenges of replacing building infrastructure while maintaining operations for a portion of the building.

The Integration of Maternity Services at an Academic Children's Hospital

Credits: None available.

Indiana University Health strategically relocated maternity and newborn health services in a focused effort to address infant mortality in Indiana. The renovation came with an upgrade to upgrade their health care facilities, which included renovating five floors at Riley Hospital for Children to link maternity services with pediatric services. The updated facility now houses the largest number of neonatal intensive care unit beds in Indiana. The Maternity Tower includes on-site outpatient, medical and surgical care for all mothers. Care is provided in a flexible, unified system that responds to changing patient needs through consultation, collaboration and transfer of care. The upgrade made Riley the first children's hospital in Indiana to establish an integrated, all-in-one program. The project team embraced the renovation-related challenge of working from within the box rather than having the luxury of coordinating new spaces.
Learning Objectives:
  • Discover why the health facilities management community needs to be more involved in cybersecurity and the many benefits from getting involved.
  • Discuss why device visibility is paramount to reliability-centered RCM but almost impossible to achieve.
  • Leverage the work that Clinical Engineering, IT and Infosec are doing within your organization.
  • Prepare your computerized maintenance management system to automate RCM.

Every Byte Counts: Why RCM Needs Cybersecurity

Credits: None available.

What if your computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) automatically ingested all the device data detail it needed to support reliability-centered maintenance (RCM)? Clinical Engineering is beginning that new operational workflow by automating utilization data to drive an alternative equipment maintenance (AEM) program. Learn how the same technology can be used with building management systems to identify and provide granular device detail on programmable logic controllers, remote terminal units, engineering workstations, homeless management information systems, supervisory control and data acquisition systems and more. Can this data be operationalized into a CMMS and drive utilization-based maintenance, schedules, procurement and parts management? Join us as we explore how to realize RCM and the real benefits that are right around the corner.
Learning Objectives:
  • Identify current trends in which FGI Guidelines are heading.
  • Understand justification for the current trends.
  • Share your thoughts and opinions with the advocacy team on the future direction of the guideline.
  • Influence the ASHE representatives in their advocacy efforts for the next revision cycle.

FGI Guidelines: Where They are Now and How To Influence Where They are Headed

Credits: None available.

Adopted by 43 of the 50 states, the FGI Guidelines for Design and Construction of Hospitals and Outpatient Facilities play an important role in the planning, programming, and design of healthcare facilities in the United States. In this interactive session, we will look into the latest edition of the FGI Guidelines and discuss future trends for the standards that will impact health care facilities for years to come. Leah Hummel and Dave Dagenais, who are representing ASHE on the FGI Health Guidelines Revision Committee for the 2026 edition, will walk through some of the recent proposed changes and solicit feedback from the field on some key issues to guide them in their advocacy efforts.
Learning Objectives:
  • Classify the critical space with different tier level on program.
  • Combine the resources and service vendors to implement a program for environemnt of care compliance.
  • Describe a QAPI EOC program for the top-tier space for ongoing CMS andTJC compliance.  
  • Sustain the indoor environment for TJC compliance with available resources.

Visualizing Risk Categories on List Safety Drawing to Simplify the ICRA/PCRA

Credits: None available.

For licensing purposes, health care facilities are required to have preconstruction risk assessment (PCRA) and infection control risk assessment (ICRA) processes established. . The PCRA/ICRA is a formal protocol used during any health care facility demolition, construction or renovation project to identify potential health care construction risks and create mitigation strategies to reduce or eliminate them. Organizations must also have a process in place that allows for minor work tasks to be performed in established locations or under particular low-risk circumstances using predetermined levels of protective practices. Utilizing the new ASHE ICRA 2.0™ guidelines, this session will provide a step-by-step overview of how to standardize and visualize patient risk groups on life safety drawings to eliminate guesswork and confusion in advance of any maintenance or construction commencing. Attendees in engineering, facility and construction departments will leave this session empowered to accurately and easily identify the class of precautions and implement best practices to mitigate potential risk to patients, staff or visitors to any health care facility.
Learning Objectives:
  • Differentiate between necessary and unnecessary ITM activities and identify items that can either be eliminated or automated, resulting in hundreds to thousands of hours.
  • Recognize and assess the RCM process to guide teams to the appropriate maintenance bucket for tasks and focus efforts on the equipment that matters most.
  • Discover how to build a culture around continuous process improvement and understand how all, even the technologically disadvantaged, play an important role in the process.
  • Identify the current business-as-usual model and construct an alternative model showing how RCM ties to alternative equipment maintenance strategies and how the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and its accrediting organizations already permit this methodology.

Doing Less with Less: Sustainably Approach to Facilities Maintenance Activities

Credits: None available.

This session is built for health care individuals and teams that are continually struggling with the burnout caused from the current health care environment. It’s no secret that the health care facilities management (HFM) field is struggling with turnover, finding qualified individuals, succession planning, reduction in budgets, training and education, and more. In short, our profession is continually being pushed to do more with less. What if there was a secret out there that, once understood, would unleash the power of productivity and efficiency, leading your team to thrive and be successful? Well, there is, and with it, it is absolutely 100% possible to do more with less. This session will examine the current business-as-usual model for many health care facilities teams and provide a trajectory toward becoming more efficient through eliminating wasteful inspection, testing and maintenance (ITM) activities, automating ITM activities where possible, and appropriately allocating resources to tasks through a well proven, code-compliant reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) process.
Learning Objectives:
  • Explain business case for prototyping and prefabrication.
  • Demonstrate methods of design to increase opportunities for prefab.
  • Explain methods of construction implementation of prefab on nontypical elements.
  • Assess the impact of prefab strategies on project labor and schedule.

Prototyping Plus - Modular Design Meets Prefabrication

Credits: None available.

Many of us have heard the success stories of prefabrication, but what happens when you apply prefab to a project that has already been designed with modular planning principles? Continue following the story of how The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is providing quality care to a rapidly growing suburban population. First introduced in the June 2022 article of Health Facilities Management magazine titled “Planning outpatient health care facilities” by Phil LiBassi, Elizabeth Dolinar and Jason Majerus, the university has designed, constructed and activated two major ambulatory care centers in four short years. The design for the third iteration of the prototype is underway, and construction will begin in May 2023. The third project will extensively use prefabrication to reduce onsite labor and improve the construction schedule. What is different about this project is that the prototype was designed with modularity, so the opportunities for prefab extend further than pods and racks. The design team, construction team and owner will present the process and results after the first three months of construction.
Learning Objectives:
  • Identify the codes and standards applicable to all health care construction.
  • Explain the reasons for conflict between these standards.
  • Demonstrate where codes are complimentary and where they are not.
  • Provide solutions to conflicts between codes.

Is Compliance Eating Your Lunch? A Debate on Compliance Vervus Operations

Credits: None available.

This debate-style session will revolve around the potential conflicts between compliance and daily operation efforts. While both are vital to provide patient and staff safety and to keep a facility organized and safe, the discussion will provide insights into how to leverage both efforts to provide a safe and healing physical environment.

At the completion of this session attendees will be able to: